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Chronic disease - related behaviors and health among African Americans and Hispanics in the REACH Detroit 2010 communities, Michigan, and the United States.

Kieffer EC, Sinco BR, Rafferty A, Spencer MS, Palmisano G, Watt EE, Heisler M. Chronic disease - related behaviors and health among African Americans and Hispanics in the REACH Detroit 2010 communities, Michigan, and the United States. Health Promotion Practice. 2006 Jul 1; 7(3 Suppl):256S-64S.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To compare chronic disease risk factors and their correlates for African American and Hispanic residents of REACH Detroit, Michigan, and the United States. METHOD: Behavioral Risk Factor Survey data from 2001-2003 were used for comparisons and regression models. RESULTS: Several chronic disease risk factors were more prevalent among REACH Detroit residents than their Michigan and U.S. counterparts. In REACH Detroit, greater fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with more than high school education and older age among Hispanics, and meeting exercise guidelines and older age among African Americans. Less than high school education, smoking, and male gender were associated with lower consumption among African Americans. Greater physical activity was associated with younger age, male gender, and more fruit and vegetable consumption among African Americans, and unemployment among Hispanics. CONCLUSIONS: Surveillance of health behaviors in high-risk communities contributes to planning interventions and policies for reducing racial and ethnic disparities.





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