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Health Services Research & Development

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Updates from HSR&D Central Office

| 2021 Archive |

May 12, 2022

By Tiffin Ross-Shepard, BS, Scientific Merit Review Manager

Tiffin Ross-Shepard, BS, Scientific Merit Review Manager

Tiffin Ross-Shepard, BS, Scientific Merit Review Manager

The past two years have been a whirlwind serving as the Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Scientific Merit Review Board (SMRB) Program Manager. I started working in January 2020, attended the in-person SMRB in March 2020, and then the world as we knew it changed forever. It is normal for new employees to expect challenges learning procedures and policies, but nothing about 2020 was going to be “normal.” To say starting a new job during a raging pandemic presented a unique learning environment is an understatement! But I have learned that challenging situations tend to bring out the best in us and this was a unique opportunity to be innovative and possibly improve processes. The work still needed to be done and we had no choice but to figure things out. We had to stick with what worked in the past while implementing change and innovation to accomplish current tasks and future goals.

In the 24 months I have been in the role of SMRB Program Manager, my biggest accomplishment was creating a process to provide a seamless transition from the standard in-person SMRB meetings to completely virtual SMRB meetings. A reframing of how we accomplished this goal was born out of necessity due to mandatory remote work, and despite initial growing pains, it was a success. The integrity and quality of the reviewed applications was not diminished, and we streamlined some processes, becoming more technology dependent.

During this time, I also served as the HSR&D Just-In-Time (JIT) Manager and was a member of the Office of Research & Development (ORD) JIT to eRA Working Group. This group worked closely with NIH to develop the eRA VA JIT module, a module which HSR&D recently transitioned to. I think in time the new process will be worth the initial growing pains because all review application documents are in a unified database.

A colleague jokingly referred to me as a “fixer” and a “detective.” Funny but true! I find these skills beneficial to the job. I enjoy working with my HSR&D colleagues to find solutions and point them in the right direction. Equally, I enjoy responding to the various emails sent to the HSR&D Scientific Review and JIT mailboxes about our processes and when I don’t know an answer, I enjoy the research required to find out the answer or solution.

To conclude, these last two years have been a whirlwind. This position offers a wealth of opportunity to learn and grow and I can’t wait to see what’s next!




April 25, 2022

By Eric Enone, MPH, PMP, Senior Management and Program Analyst

Eric Enone, MPH, PMP Senior Management and Program Analyst

Eric Enone, MPH, PMP Senior Management and Program Analyst

In the past 7 months, I have been a key staff member and instrumental in the recruitment of new staff at Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) and Office of Research and Development (ORD). It has been an experience that has shown how human resources and recruitment policies, processes, and assessments are critical in helping in the recruitment and retention of the best possible candidates.

In the recruitment process, retention also starts. Reaching out to candidates and scheduling their first interview is really the beginning of an assessment of the candidates. Conversely, the candidates also get an opportunity to begin making an assessment of your team’s unit, program, office, or organization which eventually helps them develop an informed opinion or view of your unit, program, office, or organization. That is, what is the organization, office, or program all about? What is the “culture” and environment like? It is important to view your first and subsequent interactions/assessments with candidates as a key recruitment tool that could play a small or big role in both recruiting and retaining the best possible candidates.

It is important to have a consistent recruitment structure and plan in place as this will help make the hiring process smoother and act as a qualifying guideline for assessing and hiring the best possible candidates.




March 22, 2022

By David Atkins, MD, MPH, Director of HSR&D

David Atkins, MD, MPH, Director of HSR&D

David Atkins, MD, MPH, Director, HSR&D

One of the lasting effects of the pandemic is likely to be the disruption of traditional office work. Even as COVID cases decline and restrictions relax, it is clear that many offices will never return to their pre-pandemic work schedules. Having shown we can work effectively while being remote, the Office of Research and Development (ORD) has already made plans to reduce our office footprint and continue a maximal telework schedule. Allowing virtual work has allowed ORD to recruit from a much larger and more diverse pool of people who are not interested in moving to a high-cost city like DC. And most employers have found that allowing telework is a precondition for attracting their top candidates.

At our recent COIN Directors meeting in February, the Directors organized a fascinating session on the future of work. Most Directors indicated their centers were likely to return to a hybrid schedule but worried about losing valuable office space on campus. A presentation by University of Iowa Business School professor Stephen Courtright noted that while remote work is favored by workers it is harder on managers. It is workers’ preferences that are likely to rule the day, however, in a competitive labor market. 

There are many important advantages to telework, especially in large cities where commuting can easily eat up 2 hours a day. Telework reduces driving, commuting stress, and air pollution, allows parents to be home when kids return from school, reduces commuting costs, and provides employees time for self-care during the day. Telework is especially important for parents of young children and caregivers. There are even advantages of Zoom compared to the usual office meeting, in that it may allow more people to participate via the chat function. But we also need to acknowledge what we lose in a remote setting and be thoughtful about how to build some of that into a more virtual work life. Face-to-face interactions, non-work conversations, and social celebrations like birthday parties build connections that are harder to develop on Zoom. Physical proximity allows brief consultations about problems that may be avoided if they require a phone call. Seemingly random conversations may trigger new ideas. New employees have a harder time absorbing work culture and learning who to consult on specific issues. Some workers, especially extroverts, will miss the energy they draw from a lively office. Small tensions may escalate over email instead of getting resolved with a quick office chat. And employees who are struggling are likely to go longer before being recognized or helped. It’s no wonder that managers find the virtual environment harder. 

I admit that I miss seeing my HSR&D colleagues regularly at work. I miss the celebratory breakfasts after our SMRB meeting. I have been thrilled with the new employees we’ve been able to recruit as we offer a wider range of work options, but I also have enjoyed going back to the office to meet with the new fellows we’ve recruited. Of note, I realized that I have begun to lose track of who I had worked with in person or not, which I expect is a good sign. But please, invest $20 in a better camera for your laptop.




February 22, 2022

By Kevin J. Chaney, MGS, Scientific Program Manager

Developing an Informatics Research Agenda

Kevin J. Chaney, MGS,
Scientific Program Manager

Kevin J. Chaney, MGS, Scientific Program Manager

Prior to joining the HSR&D Team as the informatics lead,  I was privileged to lead a variety of efforts at AHRQ and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) advancing scientific discovery and knowledge generation through the innovative use of technology and analytics. These projects focused on pushing the boundaries of health IT (e.g., electronic health records [EHRs]), digital health tools and solutions, data standards, and high input computing to improve both care and research. Identifying essential collaborators to develop, implement, and refine these technologies and solutions on limited budgets and quick timeframes was exciting but also very challenging.

Joining VA with the opportunity to continue its long and storied commitment to the field of health IT and informatics research is incredibly exciting. VA is one of the few places if not the place with all the right partners, stakeholders, and dedicated experts necessary to develop, test, implement, evaluate, refine, and inform care delivery, technology, and policy. In the coming months, I’ll be working with our informatics and VA research community formulating a VA Health IT research agenda – to specify areas of focus in the coming years. ONC’s National Health IT Priorities for Research: A Policy and Development Agenda serves as an initial blueprint and has assisted other federal agencies in shaping programs and policies. I’m excited to engage with the VA community to identify specific gaps and opportunities to propel critical areas of research. What might some of these areas be?

Even as VA finds itself in a crucial stage of modernizing its own health IT infrastructure, it will be important to continue to learn from and inform our own processes [e.g., EMPIRIC QUERI] and share best practices for the field. HSR&D’s continued commitment to understand and advance health IT and data science research is key during this transition – especially for providers, and most importantly - our Veterans and their caregivers.

Additionally, VA has an opportunity to showcase how the rich and robust historical health data it has can be augmented by the expounding bevy of digital health data at our fingertips (patient reported outcomes, social determinants of health data, just to name a few). I believe our researchers and providers offer that unique ability to develop and understand how the latest technologies and techniques can be applied to best understand how data can be leveraged for knowledge generation and appropriate integration for care.

Lastly, application programming interfaces (APIs) and cloud-based services and tools will be important for how data is not only exchanged but also stored, accessed, and utilized. For two decades APIs have enabled interconnectivity and seamless data sharing, transforming the banking, shopping, and travel industries - just to name a few. The Cures Act Final Rule explicitly requires electronic health record (EHR) providers to support open standardized APIs and reduce the effort it takes to access, exchange, and use electronic health information, for patients, providers, and researchers. Just as APIs have revolutionized other areas of our lives, there is great anticipation health care and research are next. How rapidly and successfully that change happens depends on our research enterprise’s interest to develop, implement, and understand how these technologies can and should be deployed, and how we can iterate and build upon those. I’m excited to work with the dedicated scientists, researchers, and providers of the VA community to build a health IT enabled research infrastructure so research can happen more quickly and effectively.




January 19, 2022

By Lynne Padgett, PhD, FAPOS, Scientific Program Manager
Aging/Long-term Support Services and Mobility/Activity/Function portfolios

Overview

Lynne Padgett, PhD, FAPOS, Scientific Program Manager

Lynne Padgett, PhD, FAPOS, Scientific Program Manager

Approximately 60% of our Veterans are Medicare eligible, which provides an opportunity to initiate innovative programs and enhance ongoing geriatric programs and research. The current report from the Geriatrics and Extended Care program office estimates the largest areas of growth in VHA enrollees will be older Veterans (85 years and over), particularly women in this age bracket. Given the aging population, the need for long-term care settings, home-based care, and helping older Veterans maintain independence continues to grow. 

Research priorities

When examining geriatric care trends, several gaps and attendant priorities emerge for health services research opportunities in VA. One manner of classifying research priorities is by thinking through the continuum of aging and care settings. Health promotion and fitness programs help older Veterans age in place by preventing or slowing functional decline. Gerofit, for example, is a VHA “Best Practice” program that has been disseminated to 17 VA sites. Gerofit is a fitness program for Veterans ages 65 and older that has demonstrated robust improvements in Veteran quality of life, physical function, and mental health. Moreover, research has demonstrated a positive association of decreased hospitalization for participants. The program has also served as a model for both national dissemination and conversion to telehealth at the onset of the SARS CoV-2 pandemic.  

Aging in place is not only for the healthy and high functioning, as surveys suggest Veterans prioritize staying in their home environment even if they are no longer fully independent in daily activities. Ongoing research examining care delivery, quality, and cost in both home-based care and long-term care settings (e.g., Community Living Centers, State Veteran Homes) is essential when Veterans need additional care in the community. Caregiver research and palliative care remain priority areas also, as they are key components in quality Veteran care at various critical stages. Lastly, as many VA sites pursue designation as an Age Friendly Health System, health services research can establish the evidence base for successful design, implementation, quality, and cost effectiveness for our Veterans throughout the aging process.  


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