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Feasibility test of preference-based insomnia treatment for Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans.

Epstein DR, Babcock-Parziale JL, Herb CA, Goren K, Bushnell ML. Feasibility test of preference-based insomnia treatment for Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans. Rehabilitation Nursing : The Official Journal of The Association of Rehabilitation Nurses. 2013 May 1; 38(3):120-32.

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Abstract:

PURPOSE: The study determined the feasibility of implementing a brief, preference-based non-medication insomnia treatment for Iraq/Afghanistan war Veterans who experienced blast and/or other injuries resulting in an altered level of consciousness. METHODS: The study used a one-group pre-post design with a 3-month follow-up assessment. Forty-one veterans (two females, mean age 30.32 7.73 years) with a mean insomnia duration of 3.90 years ( 2.03) received treatment that included one in-person and three telephone sessions of behavioral intervention and incorporated electronic delivery components. Feasibility indicators and preliminary treatment effectiveness were assessed. FINDINGS: Results indicate the preference-based treatment was acceptable to veterans and feasible to implement. Treatment components delivered in-person were used more than electronic methods. Insomnia decreased from moderate severity to the sub-threshold range. Pre- to post-treatment effect sizes were large for most sleep outcomes. Sleep improvement maintained at the 3-month follow-up assessment. CONCLUSION: Further testing of a brief insomnia treatment model is needed. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Successful insomnia treatment has the potential to maximize rehabilitation outcomes in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom veterans and may provide a non-stigmatizing entry to mental health services.





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