Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Racial differences among patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery: a population-based trend analysis from 2002 to 2008.

Worni M, Guller U, Maciejewski ML, Curtis LH, Gandhi M, Pietrobon R, Jacobs DO, Østbye T. Racial differences among patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery: a population-based trend analysis from 2002 to 2008. Obesity surgery. 2013 Feb 1; 23(2):226-33.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery (LGBS) has become the most widely used bariatric procedure due to its beneficial long-term outcomes for patients with morbid obesity. However, it is unclear whether racial differences in admission for LGBS have changed over time compared to racial differences in all other admissions. We aimed to investigate the trends and differences in the use of LGBS among white, African-American, and Hispanic patients from 2002 to 2008. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of data on obese adult patients operated between 2002 and 2008, using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. The probability of being admitted for LGBS was estimated using logistic regression with race, year, and year by race interaction as predictors, controlling for numerous patient and hospital characteristics. RESULTS: Among 1,704,972 obese hospitalized patients captured through NIS from 2002 to 2008, 2.6 % underwent LGBS (2.8 % Whites, 1.7 % African-Americans, and 2.6 % Hispanics). In adjusted analysis, obese African-American (OR 0.48, p < 0.001) and Hispanic patients (OR 0.59, p < 0.001) were less likely to be admitted for LGBS than white patients in 2002. Race-year interactions showed that the odds of African-Americans undergoing LGBS significantly increased from 2002 to 2008 compared with Whites (annual OR 1.03, p < 0.001) while no such increase was detected for Hispanics (annual OR 1.02, p = 0.11). In 2008, African-American (OR 0.58, p < 0.001) and Hispanic patients (OR 0.65, p < 0.001) still had lower odds than white patients. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study showing that the difference in the use of LGBS between obese African-American and white patients declined between 2002 and 2008. However, LGBS use still remained significantly lower for both African-American and Hispanic patients in 2008 compared with white patients.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.