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Copayment reductions generate greater medication adherence in targeted patients.

Maciejewski ML, Farley JF, Parker J, Wansink D. Copayment reductions generate greater medication adherence in targeted patients. Health affairs (Project Hope). 2010 Nov 1; 29(11):2002-8.

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Abstract:

A large value-based insurance design program offered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina eliminated generic medication copayments and reduced copayments for brand-name medications. Our study showed that the program improved adherence to medications for diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and congestive heart failure. We found that adherence improved for enrollees, ranging from a gain of 3.8 percentage points for patients with diabetes to 1.5 percentage points for those taking calcium-channel blockers, when compared to others whose employers did not offer a similar program. An examination of longer-term adherence and trends in health care spending is still needed to provide a compelling evidence base for value-based insurance design.





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