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Removing Race from eGFR calculations: Implications for Urologic Care.

Vilson FL, Schmidt B, White L, Soerensen SJC, Ganesan C, Pao AC, Enemchukwu E, Chertow GM, Leppert JT. Removing Race from eGFR calculations: Implications for Urologic Care. Urology. 2022 Apr 1; 162:42-48.

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Abstract:

Equations estimating the glomerular filtration rate are important clinical tools in detecting and managing kidney disease. Urologists extensively use these equations in clinical decision making. For example, the estimated glomerular function rate is used when considering the type of urinary diversion following cystectomy, selecting systemic chemotherapy in managing urologic cancers, and deciding the type of cross-sectional imaging in diagnosing or staging urologic conditions. However, these equations, while widely accepted, are imprecise and adjust for race which is a social, not a biologic construct. The recent killings of unarmed Black Americans in the US have amplified the discussion of racism in healthcare and has prompted institutions to reconsider the role of race in estimation of glomerular filtration rate equations and raced-based medicine. Urologist should be aware of the consequences of removing race from these equations, potential alternatives, and how these changes may affect Black patients receiving urologic care.





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