Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Early Stage Bladder Cancer: Do Pathology Reports Tell Us What We Need to Know?

Schroeck FR, Pattison EA, Denhalter DW, Patterson OV, DuVall SL, Seigne JD, Robertson DJ, Sirovich B, Goodney PP. Early Stage Bladder Cancer: Do Pathology Reports Tell Us What We Need to Know? Urology. 2016 Dec 1; 98:58-63.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To assess a large national sample of bladder cancer pathology reports to determine if they contained the components necessary for clinical decision-making. METHODS: We examined a random sample of 507 bladder cancer pathology reports from the national Department of Veterans Affairs Corporate Data Warehouse to assess whether each included information on the 4 report components explicitly recommended by the College of American Pathologists' protocol for the examination of such specimens: histology, grade, presence vs absence of muscularis propria in the specimen, and microscopic extent. We then assessed variation in the proportion of reports lacking at least 1 component across Department of Veterans Affairs facilities. RESULTS: One hundred eight of 507 reports (21%) lacked at least 1 of the 4 components, with microscopic extent and presence vs absence of muscularis propria in the specimen most commonly missing (each in 11% of reports). There was wide variation across facilities in the proportion of reports lacking at least 1 component, ranging from 0% to 80%. CONCLUSION: One-fifth of bladder cancer pathology reports lack information needed for clinical decision-making. The wide variation in incomplete report rates across facilities implies that some facilities already have implemented best practices assuring complete reporting whereas others have room for improvement. Future work to better understand barriers and facilitators of complete reporting may lead to interventions that improve bladder cancer care.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.