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Comparison of self-report and clinician-rated measures of psychiatric symptoms and functioning in predicting 1-year hospital readmission.

Clements KM, Murphy JM, Eisen SV, Normand SL. Comparison of self-report and clinician-rated measures of psychiatric symptoms and functioning in predicting 1-year hospital readmission. Administration and policy in mental health. 2006 Sep 1; 33(5):568-77.

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Abstract:

This study compared the self-report Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-32) and clinician-rated Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) in their ability to predict a measure of psychiatric outcome, 1-year psychiatric hospital readmission. BASIS-32 and GAF were completed at admission for 1034 patients in an inpatient psychiatric facility. Multiple informants analysis was used to determine the difference between the two in predicting readmission within 1 year. We also examined sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value positive of the two measures, and whether self-report added information above clinician rating in predicting outcome. While the odds of 1-year readmission decreased with increasing BASIS-32 score, there was no association between change in GAF score and 1-year readmission. Although neither measure used alone demonstrated high predictive value, using both scores improved predictive ability over using clinician rating alone. In this setting, self-report was better than clinician rating in predicting psychiatric outcome. Differences between the two in relation to other outcomes need to be examined.





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