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Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with physical capacity, disability, and self-rated health in Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Study participants.

Botoseneanu A, Ambrosius WT, Beavers DP, de Rekeneire N, Anton S, Church T, Folta SC, Goodpaster BH, King AC, Nicklas BJ, Spring B, Wang X, Gill TM, LIFE Study Groups. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with physical capacity, disability, and self-rated health in Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Study participants. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2015 Feb 1; 63(2):222-32.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its association with physical capacity, disability, and self-rated health in older adults at high risk of mobility disability, including those with and without diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis. SETTING: Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study. PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling sedentary adults aged 70 to 89 at high risk of mobility disability (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) score 9; mean 7.4 1.6) (N = 1,535). MEASUREMENTS: Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the 2009 multiagency harmonized criteria; outcomes were physical capacity (400-m walk time, grip strength, SPPB score), disability (composite 19-item score), and self-rated health (5-point scale ranging from excellent to poor). RESULTS: The prevalence of MetS was 49.8% in the overall sample (83.2% of those with diabetes mellitus, 38.1% of those without). MetS was associated with stronger grip strength (mean difference ( ) = 1.2 kg, P = .01) in the overall sample and in participants without diabetes mellitus and with poorer self-rated health ( = 0.1 kg, P < .001) in the overall sample only. No significant differences were found in 400-m walk time, SPPB score, or disability score between participants with and without MetS, in the overall sample or diabetes mellitus subgroups. CONCLUSION: Metabolic dysfunction is highly prevalent in older adults at risk of mobility disability, yet consistent associations were not observed between MetS and walking speed, lower extremity function, or self-reported disability after adjusting for known and potential confounders. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether MetS accelerates declines in functional status in high-risk older adults and to inform clinical and public health interventions aimed at preventing or delaying disability in this group.





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