Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Denominator doesn't matter: standardizing healthcare-associated infection rates by bed days or device days.

Horstman MJ, Li YF, Almenoff PL, Freyberg RW, Trautner BW. Denominator doesn't matter: standardizing healthcare-associated infection rates by bed days or device days. Infection control and hospital epidemiology. 2015 Jun 1; 36(6):710-6.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact on infection rates and hospital rank for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) using device days and bed days as the denominator DESIGN: Retrospective survey from October 2010 to July 2013 SETTING: Veterans Health Administration medical centers providing acute medical and surgical care PATIENTS: Patients admitted to 120 Veterans Health Administration medical centers reporting healthcare-associated infections METHODS: We examined the importance of using device days and bed days as the denominator between infection rates and hospital rank for CAUTI, CLABSI, and VAP for each medical center. The relationship between device days and bed days as the denominator was assessed using a Pearson correlation, and changes in infection rates and device utilization were evaluated by an analysis of variance. RESULTS: A total of 7.9 million bed days were included. From 2011 to 2013, CAUTI decreased whether measured by device days (2.32 to 1.64, P = .001) or bed days (4.21 to 3.02, P = .006). CLABSI decreased when measured by bed days (1.67 to 1.19, P = .04). VAP rates and device utilization ratios for CAUTI, CLABSI, and VAP were not statistically different across time. Infection rates calculated with device days were strongly correlated with infection rates calculated with bed days (r = 0.79-0.94, P < .001). Hospital relative performance measured by ordered rank was also strongly correlated for both denominators (r = 0.82-0.96, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that device days and bed days are equally effective adjustment metrics for comparing healthcare-associated infection rates between hospitals in the setting of stable device utilization.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.