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Improving diabetes medication adherence: successful, scalable interventions.

Zullig LL, Gellad WF, Moaddeb J, Crowley MJ, Shrank W, Granger BB, Granger CB, Trygstad T, Liu LZ, Bosworth HB. Improving diabetes medication adherence: successful, scalable interventions. Patient preference and adherence. 2015 Jan 23; 9:139-49.

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Abstract:

Effective medications are a cornerstone of prevention and disease treatment, yet only about half of patients take their medications as prescribed, resulting in a common and costly public health challenge for the US health care system. Since poor medication adherence is a complex problem with many contributing causes, there is no one universal solution. This paper describes interventions that were not only effective in improving medication adherence among patients with diabetes, but were also potentially scalable (ie, easy to implement to a large population). We identify key characteristics that make these interventions effective and scalable. This information is intended to inform health care systems seeking proven, low resource, cost-effective solutions to improve medication adherence.





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