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The role of comorbidities in patients' hypertension self-management.

Fix GM, Cohn ES, Solomon JL, Cortés DE, Mueller N, Kressin NR, Borzecki A, Katz LA, Bokhour BG. The role of comorbidities in patients' hypertension self-management. Chronic Illness. 2014 Jun 1; 10(2):81-92.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: We sought to understand barriers to hypertension self-management in patients with hypertension and comorbidities. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 48 patients with uncontrolled hypertension and at least one comorbidity to learn about beliefs and behaviors that might affect hypertension self-management. Using a grounded theory strategy, we analyzed interview transcripts detailing patients' hypertension self-management behaviors vis-à-vis a framework including Explanatory Models-a patient's understanding of the pathophysiology, cause, course, treatment, and severity of an illness, such as hypertension. RESULTS: We identified four factors that interfered with hypertension self-management. (1) Interdependence: Participants saw hypertension as interconnected to their comorbidities and subsequently had difficulty separating information about their illnesses. (2) Low priority: Compared to other conditions, participants assigned hypertension a lower priority. (3) Conflicts: Participants struggled with conflicts between hypertension self-management practices and those for comorbidities. (4) Managing multiple medications: Polypharmacy led to patients' confusion and concern about taking medications as prescribed. DISCUSSION: Participants did not experience hypertension as a discreet clinical condition; rather, they self-managed hypertension concurrently with other conditions, leading to a breakdown in hypertension self-management. We provide strategies to address each of the four barriers to better equip providers in addressing their clinically salient concerns.





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