skip to page content
Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Trends and predictors of quality of care in VA nursing homes related to serious mental illness.

Kim HM, Banaszak-Holl J, Kales H, Mach J, Blow F, McCarthy JF. Trends and predictors of quality of care in VA nursing homes related to serious mental illness. Medical care. 2013 Aug 1; 51(8):659-65.

Related HSR&D Project(s)

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Within Veterans Affairs (VA) nursing homes (NHs), quality issues have a tremendous impact on the population with serious mental illness (SMI), who are more likely than their non-SMI Veteran counterparts to use NH services. We examined recent trends in quality indicators (QIs) measuring poor performance of VA NHs and whether the facility-level QIs vary with SMI concentration within the facility. METHODS: From VA administrative records including Minimum Data Set assessments, we identified all residents in the 135 VA NHs between fiscal years 2005 (FY05) through FY07. We used a zero-inflated Poisson regression to assess trends in and facility-level predictors of 3 process-related QIs: depression without antidepressant therapy; bladder/bowel incontinence without a toileting plan; and physical restraint use. Facility-level predictors included collocated special care units, rurality, staffing, physical plant characteristics, SMI prevalence, and SMI admission volume. RESULTS: During FY05-FY07, restraint use declined from 1.2% to 1.1% and incontinence without a toileting plan from 25.8% to 22.1%, but untreated depression increased from 5.1% to 5.5%. Despite overall gains in quality, higher SMI prevalence was associated with higher odds of physical restraint use and lack of toileting plan. Higher SMI prevalence was also associated with higher frequency of untreated depression. Other characteristics such as complex building structure were predictive of variation in quality, but the relationships were not consistent across QI types. CONCLUSION: VA NHs had significant improvements in these examined QIs during the study period. Nonetheless, overall poorer quality was observed at sites with higher SMI concentrations.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.