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Brief psychotherapy for depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Nieuwsma JA, Trivedi RB, McDuffie J, Kronish I, Benjamin D, Williams JW. Brief psychotherapy for depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis. International journal of psychiatry in medicine. 2013 Jul 12; 43(2):129-51.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Because evidence-based psychotherapies of 12 to 20 sessions can be perceived as too lengthy and time intensive for the treatment of depression in primary care, a number of studies have examined abbreviated psychotherapy protocols. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the efficacy of brief psychotherapy (i.e., < or = 8 sessions) for depression. METHODS: We used combined literature searches in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and an Internet-accessible database of clinical trials of psychotherapy to conduct two systematic searches: one for existing systematic reviews and another for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Included studies examined evidence-based psychotherapy(s) of eight or fewer sessions, focused on adults with depression, contained an acceptable control condition, were published in English, and used validated measures of depressive symptoms. Results: We retained 2 systematic reviews and 15 RCTs evaluating cognitive behavioral therapy, problem-solving therapy, and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy. The systematic reviews found brief psychotherapies to be more efficacious than control, with effect sizes ranging from -0.33 to -0.25. Our meta-analysis found six to eight sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy to be more efficacious than control (ES -0.42, 95% CI -0.74 to -0.10, 12 = 56%). A sensitivity analysis controlled for statistical heterogeneity but showed smaller treatment effects (ES -0.24, 95% CI -0.42 to -0.06, 12 = 0%). CONCLUSIONS: Depression can be efficaciously treated with six to eight sessions of psychotherapy, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy and problem-solving therapy. Access to non-pharmacologic treatments for depression could be improved by training healthcare providers to deliver brief psychotherapies.





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