Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Correlates of expected positive and negative support for smoking cessation among a sample of chronically ill veterans.

Fish LJ, Gierisch JM, Stechuchak KM, Grambow SC, Rohrer LD, Bastian LA. Correlates of expected positive and negative support for smoking cessation among a sample of chronically ill veterans. Addictive Behaviors. 2012 Jan 1; 37(1):135-8.

Related HSR&D Project(s)

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To examine demographic, relationship, and smoking history factors related to expected positive and negative support for quitting smoking among chronically ill veterans. METHODS: Data for this report comes from baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of a support-based smoking cessation intervention for veterans with chronic diseases (cancer, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). We used separate multiple linear regression models to analyze relationships between positive and negative support and variables selected for model entry. RESULTS: Veterans in our sample expected high positive and negative support for quitting. Veterans who were married/living as married, had some college education, were female, or named a female support person expected higher levels of positive support. Veterans who named a female or a nonsmoker as a support person expected higher levels of negative support. Males and non-Caucasians also reported higher levels of expected negative support. CONCLUSIONS: Individual differences that influence perceptions of expected support are likely to influence intervention participation and engagement. Thus, understanding factors associated with expected positive and negative support is necessary to optimize future implementation of support-based cessation interventions through better treatment matching.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.