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Scanning training in neurological vision loss: Case Studies

Goodrich G. Scanning training in neurological vision loss: Case Studies. Eye and Brain. 2010 May 1; 2010(2):47-55.

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Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to describe the response of a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center's development of a rehabilitation program for patients with hemianopsia. Hemianopsia affects significant numbers of troops returning from Afghanistan and Iraq and their neurological vision loss presented unique challenges in developing an appropriate and effective rehabilitation program. A literature review indicated that existing therapies lacked supporting scientific evidence and that Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)-related vision loss affects large numbers of civilians. The increasing number of patients with TBI-related vision loss necessitated the development of an innovative program which combined elements of therapies that the literature suggested were most promising. In this paper we briefly review the literature, describe the rehabilitation program developed, and present case studies of two patients who incurred vision loss as a result of a motor vehicle accident and a gunshot wound. The intent of the article is to begin the documentation of our ongoing, evidence based neurological vision loss rehabilitation program. We also encourage others who do not currently do so to assess the need for implementing vision rehabilitation programs for patients with TBI-related vision loss.





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