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The association between rural residence and the use, type, and quality of depression care.

Fortney JC, Harman JS, Xu S, Dong F. The association between rural residence and the use, type, and quality of depression care. The Journal of rural health : official journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association. 2010 Jun 1; 26(3):205-13.

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Abstract:

Over the year, 65.1% received depression treatment, including 58.8% with at least 1 antidepressant prescription fill and 24.5% with at least 1 psychotherapy visit. Among those in treatment, 56.2% had minimally adequate pharmacotherapy treatment and 36.3% had minimally adequate psychotherapy treatment. Overall, there were no significant rural-urban differences in receipt of any type of formal depression treatment. However, rural residence was associated with significantly higher odds of receiving pharmacotherapy (MSA: OR 1.16 [95% CI, 1.01-1.34; P = .04] and RUCC: OR 1.04 [95% CI, 1.00-1.08; P = .05]), and significantly lower odds of receiving psychotherapy (MSA: OR 0.62 [95% CI, 0.53-0.74; P < .01] and RUCC: OR 0.91 [95% CI, 0.88-0.94; P < .001]). Rural residence was not significantly associated with the adequacy of pharmacotherapy, but it was significantly associated with the adequacy of psychotherapy (MSA: OR 0.53 [95% CI, 0.41-0.69; P < .01] and RUCC: OR 0.92 [95% CI, 0.86-0.99; P = .02]). Psychiatrists per capita were a mediator in the psychotherapy analyses. Conclusions: Rural individuals are more reliant on pharmacotherapy than psychotherapy. This may be a concern if individuals in rural areas turn to pharmacotherapy because psychotherapists are unavailable rather than because they have a preference for pharmacotherapy.





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