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Uninsured adults with chronic conditions or disabilities: gaps in public insurance programs.

Pizer SD, Frakt AB, Iezzoni LI. Uninsured adults with chronic conditions or disabilities: gaps in public insurance programs. Health affairs (Project Hope). 2009 Nov 1; 28(6):w1141-50.

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Abstract:

Among nonelderly U.S. adults (ages 25-61), uninsurance rates increased from 13.7 percent in 2000 to 16.0 percent in 2005. Despite the existence of public insurance programs, rates remained high for low-income people reporting serious health conditions (25 percent across years) or disabilities (15 percent). Residents of southern states had even higher rates (32 percent with health conditions, 22 percent with disabilities). Those who did not belong to a federally mandated Medicaid eligibility category were about twice as likely as others to be uninsured overall, and uninsurance among this group increased more rapidly over time. These regional and categorical differences reflect gaps in current policy that pose challenges for incremental health reform.





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