Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Patient education and provider decision support to control blood pressure in primary care: a cluster randomized trial.

Bosworth HB, Olsen MK, Dudley T, Orr M, Goldstein MK, Datta SK, McCant F, Gentry P, Simel DL, Oddone EZ. Patient education and provider decision support to control blood pressure in primary care: a cluster randomized trial. American heart journal. 2009 Mar 1; 157(3):450-6.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Less than one third of the 65 million Americans with hypertension have adequate blood pressure (BP) control. This study examined the effectiveness of 2 interventions for improving patient BP control. METHODS: This was a 2-level (primary care provider and patient) cluster randomized trial with 2-year follow-up occurring among patients with hypertension enrolled from a Veterans Affairs Medical Center primary care clinic. Primary care providers (n = 17) in the intervention received computer-generated decision support designed to improve guideline concordant medical therapy at each visit; control providers (n = 15) received a reminder at each visit. Patients received usual care or a bimonthly tailored nurse-delivered behavioral telephone intervention to improve hypertension treatment. The primary outcome was proportion of patients who achieved a BP < 140/90 mm Hg ( < 130/85 for diabetic patients) over the 24-month intervention. RESULTS: Of the 816 eligible patients contacted, 190 refused and 38 were excluded. The 588 enrolled patients had a mean age of 63 years, 43% had adequate baseline BP control, and 482 (82%) completed the 24-month follow-up. There were no significant differences in amount of change in BP control in the 3 intervention groups as compared to the hypertension reminder control group. In secondary analyses, rates of BP control for all patients receiving the patient behavioral intervention (n = 294) improved from 40.1% to 54.4% at 24 months (P = .03); patients in the nonbehavioral intervention group improved from 38.2% to 43.9% (P = .38), but there was no between-group differences at the end of the study. CONCLUSION: The brief behavioral intervention showed improved outcomes over time, but there were not significant between group differences.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.