Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Improving emergency caesarean delivery response times at a rural community hospital.

Mooney SE, Ogrinc G, Steadman W. Improving emergency caesarean delivery response times at a rural community hospital. Quality & Safety in Health Care. 2007 Feb 1; 16(1):60-6.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: According to national organisations, obstetric services should be able to initiate a caesarean delivery within 30 minutes of the decision to operate. This is uniquely challenging in a small, rural hospital. In 2001, the authors'' hospital was unable to meet this guideline reliably. This project demonstrates how we improved our emergency caesarean delivery response time. METHODS: The caesarean delivery process was examined, project co-chairs were selected and key personnel were identified. Four working groups (doctors, nurses, anaesthesia, operating room personnel) were formed to analyse and improve component parts of the process. Over time, multiple small changes were made, initially by each working group and then by the entire caesarean delivery team. Decision-to-incision time was the main outcome measure. The authors also measured standard birth statistics and tracked the percentage of caesarean deliveries that were classified as an emergency. RESULTS: Forty emergency caesarean deliveries occurred during the study. The mean decision-to-incision time dropped from 31 to 20 minutes and the treatment to goal ratio increased from 0.5 to 1.0. The percentage of caesarean deliveries that were classified as emergencies dropped significantly. There has been no change in the overall caesarean delivery rate or other markers of obstetric quality. CONCLUSIONS: A small, rural community hospital with limited resources can consistently meet the 30 minute decision-to-incision guideline for emergency caesarean delivery.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.