Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Brief report: lack of a race effect in primary care ratings among women veterans.

Bean-Mayberry B, Chang CC, Scholle SH. Brief report: lack of a race effect in primary care ratings among women veterans. Journal of general internal medicine. 2006 Oct 1; 21(10):1105-8.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of race on primary care quality and satisfaction among women in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). METHODS: We used a mail survey to measure primary care quality and satisfaction. We focused on 4 primary care domains: patient preference for provider, interpersonal communication, accumulated knowledge, and coordination. We performed univariate analyses to compare variables by race and multiple logistic regression analysis to examine the effect of race on the probability of reporting a perfect score on each domain, while adjusting for patient characteristics and site. RESULTS: Black women were younger, unmarried, educated, of higher income, and reported female providers and gynecological care in VA more often. In regression analysis, race was not significantly associated with any primary care domain or satisfaction. Gynecological care from VA provider was associated with perfect ratings on patient preference for provider (odds ratio [OR] 2.0, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.3, 3.1), and satisfaction (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2, 2.3), while female provider was associated with interpersonal communication (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.4, 2.6). CONCLUSIONS: While demographics and health experiences vary by race among veterans, race had no effect on primary care ratings. Future studies need to determine whether this racial equity persists in health outcomes among women veterans.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.