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New domiciliary supplemental oxygen therapy after hospitalisation for COVID-19 in metropolitan Chicago.

Kaul M, Gupta P, Kalra S, Gardner J, Gordon HS, Rubinstein I. New domiciliary supplemental oxygen therapy after hospitalisation for COVID-19 in metropolitan Chicago. ERJ open research. 2022 Jan 1; 8(1).

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: A knowledge gap exists in understanding the beneficial use and duration of domiciliary supplemental oxygen (DSO) therapy among survivors of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) hospitalisations with persistent hypoxaemia upon discharge. The purpose of this single centre study was to begin to address this issue. METHODS: In this retrospective study we report features of US military veterans residing in metropolitan Chicago with no prior DSO therapy who survived COVID-19 hospitalisation, were discharged on DSO and were followed for 6 months. RESULTS: We found that the majority of the 65 elderly patients (median age, 70 years), predominantly obese Black males, who survived COVID-19 hospitalisations at the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center and were discharged on DSO did not undergo a formal 6-min walk test (6MWT) to re-assess ongoing ambulatory supplemental oxygen requirements (46 patients or 71%). Nonetheless, DSO therapy was discontinued in most patients predominantly within 8 weeks of hospital discharge (34 patients, 52%). In addition, a large proportion of patients, obese Black people in particular, who survived COVID-19 hospitalisations and were treated with DSO for at least 8 weeks thereafter developed post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 infection (PASC) (30 patients, 46%). CONCLUSIONS: Given these findings, we recommend that healthcare providers be appraised about proper monitoring and evaluation, including timely performance of 6MWT, of patients who survived COVID-19 hospitalisations and were treated with DSO for persistent hypoxaemia upon discharge. Whether obese Black males who survived COVID-19 hospitalisations and are treated with DSO thereafter have an elevated risk in developing PASC remains to be determined in larger, prospective studies.





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