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The role of resilience and gender: Understanding the relationship between risk for traumatic stress, resilience, and academic outcomes among minoritized youth.

Ijadi-Maghsoodi R, Venegas-Murillo A, Klomhaus A, Aralis H, Lee K, Rahmanian Koushkaki S, Lester P, Escudero P, Kataoka S. The role of resilience and gender: Understanding the relationship between risk for traumatic stress, resilience, and academic outcomes among minoritized youth. Psychological trauma : theory, research, practice and policy. 2022 Apr 1; 14(S1):S82-S90.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Minoritized students experience high trauma rates which can impact academic outcomes, and experiences may differ between males and females. We investigated the relationship between traumatic stress and academic outcomes by gender among predominantly minoritized students, and whether resilience-building assets can mediate the relationship between traumatic stress and academic outcomes. METHOD: School administrative data were linked to survey data from 9th graders in 2016-2018 across 37 West Coast schools. We examined the association between traumatic stress risk and academic outcomes by gender. Where significant associations were found, mixed effects regression models accounting for school-level variation were fit to assess the role of resilience-building assets as potential mediators of the relationship between traumatic stress risk and academic outcomes. RESULTS: Among 1,750 female and 2,036 male students, we found no significant association between traumatic stress risk and low attendance ( < 96% days attended). The odds of low grade point average (GPA < 2.0) were significantly higher among female students with traumatic stress risk ( = 1.46, 95% CI [1.16, 1.84]), with no association among males. In models controlling for resilience-building assets, the magnitude of the association between traumatic stress risk and GPA < 2.0 among females was reduced. We identified significant mediation for 3 resilience measures: self-efficacy (21.20%; < .05), school support (18.97%; < .05), and total internal assets (27.84%; < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Resilience-building assets may partially mediate the effect of traumatic stress on GPA among females. Resilience initiatives, especially among minoritized female students, may protect against the effect of trauma on academics. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).





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