Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Risk of Postpartum Urinary Stone Disease in Women with History of Urinary Stone Disease During Pregnancy.

Spradling K, Zhang CA, Pao AC, Liao JC, Leppert JT, Elliott CS, Conti SL. Risk of Postpartum Urinary Stone Disease in Women with History of Urinary Stone Disease During Pregnancy. Journal of endourology. 2022 Jan 1; 36(1):138-142.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

To determine the risk of postpartum urinary stone disease in women with a history of stone disease during pregnancy. Using the Optum de-identified Clinformatics Datamart we identified pregnant women with urinary stone disease in the United States between January 2003 to December 2017 by standardized International Classification of Diseases Ninth and Tenth Editions (ICD-9 and ICD-10), and Current Procedural Terminology code criteria. We limited the cohort to include women without evidence of urinary stone disease before pregnancy. We abstracted patient demographic characteristics, clinical risk factors for stone disease, and data for urinary stone disease encounters and related procedures after pregnancy. Encounters occurring within 1 year of pregnancy were excluded. Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyze for significance. We identified a total of 1,395,783 pregnant women with a median postpartum follow-up of 4.0 years, including 5971 (0.4%) women with a urinary stone during pregnancy. Of these, 736 12.3% had an additional urinary stone diagnosis claim after pregnancy, compared with 13,275 (0.95%) women without a history of stone disease during pregnancy (? < 0.0001). In multivariable proportional hazards models urinary stone disease during pregnancy (hazards ratio 12.8, 95% confidence interval [11.8-13.8]) was independently associated with a higher hazard of urinary stone disease after pregnancy. Women with urinary stone disease during pregnancy were more likely to present with recurrent urinary stone disease after pregnancy. Given the one in eight chance of needing further care, women with history of stone disease during pregnancy may benefit from risk counseling, surveillance, or secondary prevention efforts in the postpartum period.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.