Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Quantifying Ambulatory Care Use Preceding Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions.

Dev S, Goldstick J, Peterson T, Brenner J, Abir M. Quantifying Ambulatory Care Use Preceding Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions. American journal of medical quality : the official journal of the American College of Medical Quality. 2021 Dec 2.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC) represent a significant source of health care spending in the United States. Existing literature is largely descriptive and there is limited information about how an emergency department (ED) visit or hospitalization for ACSCs is related to prior ambulatory care visits. A retrospective, observational study was conducted using health records from a large midwestern health system during a 20-month period between 2012 and 2014. Our primary variables were (1) type of care setting (i.e., ED visit or hospitalization) and (2) whether the patient received ambulatory care services in the 14, 30, and 60 days before the ED visit or hospital admission. Of patients seen in the ED for ACSCs, 11.9%, 16.3%, and 21.67% were seen in ambulatory care in the 14, 30, and 60 days prior, respectively. Of those hospitalized for ACSCs, 29.1%, 39.9%, and 53% were seen in ambulatory care in the 14, 30, and 60 days prior, respectively. These results highlight a potential lost opportunity to address ACSCs in the ambulatory care setting. Such knowledge can inform interventions to reduce avoidable ACSC-related acute care use and health care costs, and improve patient outcomes.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.