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Factors associated with recovery from homelessness among veterans in permanent supportive housing.

Gabrielian S, Koosis ER, Cohenmehr J, Hellemann G, Tuepker A, Green MF, Vazzano JK, Young AS. Factors associated with recovery from homelessness among veterans in permanent supportive housing. Journal of Community Psychology. 2021 Dec 4.

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Abstract:

AIMS: We sought to identify person- and program-level factors distinguishing permanent supportive housing (PSH) residents with higher versus lower social integration; and higher versus lower instrumental functioning. METHODS: Among 60 PSH residents at Los Angeles' VA, surveys and medical records captured person-level factors. Using a median split, we dichotomized participants with higher versus lower social integration; and higher versus lower instrumental functioning. Recursive partitioning (RP) identified variables that best-differentiated these subgroups. Interviews with 26 participants captured their perceptions on social integration and instrumental functioning. RESULTS: Using RP, health-related quality of life, psychiatric symptoms and case management frequency best-differentiated the social integration subgroups. Few perceived that PSH affected social integration. RP did not yield a stable model to differentiate the instrumental functioning subgroups; participants perceived that PSH addressed most functional deficits. CONCLUSIONS: Services that enhance social integration may benefit PSH residents with poor health; existing services may adequately address instrumental functioning.





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