Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Change in Learning and Memory Partially Mediates Effects of Compensatory Cognitive Training on Self-Reported Cognitive Symptoms.

O'Neil ME, Cameron D, Shirley K, Sano E, Twamley E, Williams R, Turner A, Pagulayan K, Roost M, Jak A, Storzbach D, Huckans M. Change in Learning and Memory Partially Mediates Effects of Compensatory Cognitive Training on Self-Reported Cognitive Symptoms. The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation. 2021 Nov 1; 36(6):429-436.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: To examine associations among compensatory cognitive training (CCT), objective cognitive functioning, and self-reported cognitive symptoms. We examined whether change in objective cognitive functioning associated with participation in CCT at 10-week follow-up mediates change in self-reported cognitive symptoms associated with CCT at 15-week follow-up. SETTING: Three VA outpatient mental health clinics. PARTICIPANTS: Veterans with a history of mild traumatic brain injury who reported cognitive deficits. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial post hoc causal mediation analysis. MAIN MEASURES: Self-reported cognitive symptoms were measured by the Prospective-Retrospective Memory Questionnaire and the Multiple Sclerosis Neuropsychological Screening Questionnaire. Objective cognitive functioning was measured using a battery of neuropsychological tests. RESULTS: Improvement on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R) Delayed Recall test mediated the association between participation in CCT and decrease in the Prospective-Retrospective Memory Questionnaire total score. Improvement on the HVLT-R Total Recall and HVLT-R Delayed Recall tests both meditated the association between participation in CCT and decrease in the Multiple Sclerosis Neuropsychological Screening Questionnaire total score. No other measures of objective cognitive functioning were significant mediators. CONCLUSION: Patients'' perceptions of cognitive symptom improvement due to CCT are partially mediated by learning and memory, though these subjective improvements occur regardless of other changes in objective cognitive functioning associated with CCT.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.