Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

One-day acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) workshop improves anxiety but not vascular function or inflammation in adults with moderate to high anxiety levels in a randomized controlled trial.

Fiedorowicz JG, Dindo L, Ajibewa T, Persons J, Marchman J, Holwerda SW, Abosi OJ, DuBose LE, Wooldridge N, Myers J, Stroud AK, Dubishar K, Liu Z, Pierce GL. One-day acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) workshop improves anxiety but not vascular function or inflammation in adults with moderate to high anxiety levels in a randomized controlled trial. General hospital psychiatry. 2021 Nov 1; 73:64-70.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a behavioral intervention demonstrating sustained improvements in anxiety in individuals with chronic anxiety and psychological distress. Because anxiety disorders are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), we hypothesized that a novel 1-day ACT workshop would both lower anxiety and improve vascular function in persons with moderate/high anxiety. METHODS: In a randomized controlled study, 72 adults (age 33.9 ± 8.6 (SD) years) with baseline moderate/high anxiety completed a one-day ACT intervention (n  =  44, age 33.9 ± 8.7 years) or control (n  =  28, age 37.1 ± 10.1 years). Pre-specified secondary outcomes were measured over 12 weeks: aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity [cfPWV]), forearm vascular endothelial function (post-ischemic peak forearm blood flow [FBF] via plethysmography), and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Carotid artery stiffness (ß-stiffness index), and inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) were also explored. RESULTS: Although the intervention had a significant and sustained effect on the primary outcome of anxiety as measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the 1-day ACT workshop was not associated with improvement in vascular or inflammatory endpoints. The intervention was unexpectedly associated with increases in ß-stiffness index that were also associated with changing trait anxiety. CONCLUSION: Anxiety improvements did not translate into improvements in any of the vascular function outcomes. This may reflect a less-than-robust effect of the intervention on anxiety, failure in design to select those with vascular dysfunction, or not intervening on a relevant causal pathway. (Trial registration NCT02915874 at www.clinicaltrials.gov).





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.