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Using an Automated Electronic Health Record Score To Estimate Life Expectancy In Men Diagnosed With Prostate Cancer In The Veterans Health Administration.

Soerensen SJC, Thomas IC, Schmidt B, Daskivich TJ, Skolarus TA, Jackson C, Osborne TF, Chertow GM, Brooks JD, Rehkopf DH, Leppert JT. Using an Automated Electronic Health Record Score To Estimate Life Expectancy In Men Diagnosed With Prostate Cancer In The Veterans Health Administration. Urology. 2021 Sep 1; 155:70-76.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To determine if an automatically calculated electronic health record score can estimate intermediate-term life expectancy in men with prostate cancer to provide guideline concordant care. METHODS: We identified all men (n = 36,591) diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2013-2015 in the VHA. Of the 36,591, 35,364 (96.6%) had an available Care Assessment Needs (CAN) score (range: 0-99) automatically calculated in the 30 days prior to the date of diagnosis. It was designed to estimate short-term risks of hospitalization and mortality. We fit unadjusted and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models to determine the association between the CAN score and overall survival among men with prostate cancer. We compared CAN score performance to two established comorbidity measures: The Charlson Comorbidity Index and Prostate Cancer Comorbidity Index (PCCI). RESULTS: Among 35,364 men, the CAN score correlated with overall stage, with mean scores of 46.5 ( ± 22.4), 58.0 ( ± 24.4), and 68.1 ( ± 24.3) in localized, locally advanced, and metastatic disease, respectively. In both unadjusted and adjusted models for prostate cancer risk, the CAN score was independently associated with survival (HR = 1.23 95%CI 1.22-1.24 and adjusted HR = 1.17 95%CI 1.16-1.18 per 5-unit change, respectively). The CAN score (overall C-Index 0.74) yielded better discrimination (AUC = 0.76) than PCCI (AUC = 0.65) or Charlson Comorbidity Index (AUC = 0.66) for 5-year survival. CONCLUSION: The CAN score is strongly associated with intermediate-term survival following a prostate cancer diagnosis. The CAN score is an example of how learning health care systems can implement multi-dimensional tools to provide fully automated life expectancy estimates to facilitate patient-centered cancer care.





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