Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

The mediating role of avoidant coping in the relationships between physical, psychological, and social wellbeing and distress in breast cancer survivors.

Cohee A, Johns SA, Alwine JS, Talib T, Monahan PO, Stump TE, Cella D, Champion VL. The mediating role of avoidant coping in the relationships between physical, psychological, and social wellbeing and distress in breast cancer survivors. Psycho-oncology. 2021 Jul 1; 30(7):1129-1136.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Many breast cancer survivors (BCSs) recover from the negative sequelae of cancer treatment. However, some report persistent and disruptive distress well into disease-free survivorship. More information is needed on the predictors of distress in this growing population of BCS, including the role of avoidant coping, or attempts to avoid thoughts, feelings, and reminders of cancer, in mediating the relationship between distress and psychological, physical, and social domains of well-being. METHODS: In a large cross-sectional study, BCS (n  =  1,127), who were 3 to 8 years post-diagnosis, completed a survey assessing demographic characteristics, medical history, distress (anxiety and depressive symptoms), avoidant coping, and physical (fatigue), psychological (fear of recurrence, attention, body image), and social (social support from a partner, social constraints from a partner) well-being. Multiple mediation analyses were conducted to determine if avoidant coping mediated the relationship between each distress variable (anxiety and depressive symptoms) and each well-being (fear of recurrence, attention, body image, fatigue, social support, and social constraints) variable. RESULTS: In all six mediation models, avoidant coping significantly (p  <  0.001) mediated the relationship between each well-being variable (fear of recurrence, attention, body image, fatigue, social support, and social constraints) and each distress indicator (depression and anxiety). Avoidant coping mediated 19%-54% of the effects of the contributing factors on the distress variables. CONCLUSIONS: Avoidant coping may indicate risk for, or presence of, distress among BCS. Interventions to reduce distress may benefit from addressing avoidant coping styles.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.