Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Variations in health insurance coverage for rural and urban nonelderly adult residents of Florida, Indiana, and Kansas

Hu HM, Duncan RP, Radcliff TA, Porter CK, Hall AG. Variations in health insurance coverage for rural and urban nonelderly adult residents of Florida, Indiana, and Kansas. The Journal of rural health : official journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association. 2006 Apr 1; 22(2):147-50.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

CONTEXT: Evidence exists for differences in health insurance coverage among states, but less is known about variations across different kinds of communities within states. PURPOSE: This article assesses the role of residential setting (metropolitan county, rural adjacent, and rural nonadjacent) in health insurance coverage for adult residents, under age 65, using data from large-scale surveys collected in 3 diverse states (Florida, Indiana, and Kansas). METHODS: Descriptive statistics are provided, and logistic regression models are used to examine the relationship between uninsurance status and residential settings while controlling for personal characteristics. Adjusted uninsurance rates by residential settings are presented for each state. FINDINGS: Residential settings are significantly associated with uninsurance status in 2 of the 3 states we examined. We find that adult Floridians of rural adjacent counties are more likely to be uninsured than those in urban counties, but, for Indiana residents, uninsurance status is comparable between urban and rural adjacent residents. Rural nonadjacent Indiana residents are more likely to be uninsured compared to those in urban counties. The insurance status of adult Kansans does not vary across residential settings. CONCLUSION: Residential settings are significantly associated with being uninsured, but the significance of this link between residential locations and uninsurance status varies from state to state.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.