Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Prevalence of predicted gene-drug interactions for antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder in the Precision Medicine in Mental Health Care Study.

Ramsey CM, Lynch KG, Thase ME, Gelernter J, Kranzler HR, Pyne JM, Shih MC, Stone A, PRIME Care Executive Committee, Oslin DW. Prevalence of predicted gene-drug interactions for antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder in the Precision Medicine in Mental Health Care Study. Journal of affective disorders. 2021 Mar 1; 282:1272-1277.

Related HSR&D Project(s)

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing is a potentially important, but understudied approach to precision medicine that could improve prescribing practices for antidepressants (ADs) in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Thus, it is important to understand the scope of its potential impact and to identify patients who may benefit most from PGx-guided care. METHODS: Participants were treatment-seeking US veterans (N = 1149) with MDD enrolled in the Precision Medicine in Mental Health Care study, a pragmatic multi-site, randomized, controlled trial that examines the utility of PGx testing in the context of pharmacotherapy for MDD. We report the prevalence of ADs with predicted moderate and clinically significant gene-drug interaction potential based on next-intended treatment. We also examined demographic and treatment history characteristics as predictors of the gene-drug interaction potential of participants'' next-intended treatment. RESULTS: Prevalence of the next-intended AD with moderate or clinically significant gene-drug interaction was 45.1% and19.3%. Previous treatment with an AD in the past two years was associated with a 1.59 increased likelihood of having a next-intended AD treatment with predicted clinically significant gene-drug interaction (95% CI: 1.08-2.35). LIMITATIONS: The gene-drug interaction potential of ADs is specific to the PGx test panel used in this study and may not generalize to other PGx test panels. CONCLUSIONS: PGx testing could benefit one in five patients prescribed ADs with clinically significant gene-drug interaction potential. Patients with prior AD treatment are more likely to have an AD with significant gene-drug interaction potential as their next-intended treatment and therefore may benefit most from PGx testing.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.