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Depression, Alcoholics Anonymous Involvement, and Daily Drinking Among Patients with co-occurring Conditions: A Longitudinal Parallel Growth Mixture Model.

Vest N, Sox-Harris A, Ilgen M, Humphreys K, Timko C. Depression, Alcoholics Anonymous Involvement, and Daily Drinking Among Patients with co-occurring Conditions: A Longitudinal Parallel Growth Mixture Model. Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research. 2020 Dec 1; 44(12):2570-2578.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Patients with cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders often find it difficult to sustain long-term recovery. One predictor of recovery may be how depression symptoms and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) involvement influence alcohol consumption during and after inpatient psychiatric treatment. This study utilized a parallel growth mixture model to characterize the course of alcohol use, depression, and AA involvement in patients with cooccurring diagnoses. METHODS: Participants were adults with cooccurring disorders (n  =  406) receiving inpatient psychiatric care as part of a telephone monitoring clinical trial. Participants were assessed at intake, 3-, 9-, and 15-month follow-up. RESULTS: A 3-class solution was the most parsimonious based upon fit indices and clinical relevance of the classes. The classes identified were high AA involvement with normative depression (27%), high stable depression with uneven AA involvement (11%), and low AA involvement with normative depression (62%). Both the low and high AA classes reduced their drinking across time and were drinking at less than half their baseline levels at all follow-ups. The high stable depression class reported an uneven pattern of AA involvement and drank at higher daily frequencies across the study timeline. Depression symptoms and alcohol use decreased substantially from intake to 3 months and then stabilized for 90% of patients with cooccurring disorders following inpatient psychiatric treatment. CONCLUSIONS: These findings can inform future clinical interventions among patients with cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders. Specifically, patients with more severe symptoms of depression may benefit from increased AA involvement, whereas patients with less severe symptoms of depression may not.





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