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Sight and switch off: Nerve density visualization for interventions targeting nerves in prostate cancer.

You H, Shang W, Min X, Weinreb J, Li Q, Leapman M, Wang L, Tian J. Sight and switch off: Nerve density visualization for interventions targeting nerves in prostate cancer. Science advances. 2020 Feb 1; 6(6):eaax6040.

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Abstract:

Nerve density is associated with prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness and prognosis. Thus far, no visualization methods have been developed to assess nerve density of PCa in vivo. We compounded propranolol-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nerve peptide nanoparticles (PSN NPs), which achieved the nerve density visualization of PCa with high sensitivity and high specificity, and facilitated assessment of nerve density and aggressiveness of PCa using magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging. Moreover, PSN NPs facilitated targeted therapy for PCa. PSN NPs increased the survival rate of mice with orthotopic PCa to 83.3% and decreased nerve densities and proliferation indexes by more than twofold compared with the control groups. The present study, thus, developed a technology to visualize the nerve density of PCa and facilitate targeted neural drug delivery to tumors to efficiently inhibit PCa progression. Our study provides a potential basis for clinical imaging and therapeutic interventions targeting nerves in PCa.





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