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The influence of hormone replacement therapy on lung cancer incidence and mortality.

Titan AL, He H, Lui N, Liou D, Berry M, Shrager JB, Backhus LM. The influence of hormone replacement therapy on lung cancer incidence and mortality. The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2020 Apr 1; 159(4):1546-1556.e4.

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Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Data regarding the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are mixed. We hypothesized HRT would have a protective benefit with reduced NSCLC incidence among women in a large, prospective cohort. METHODS: We used data from the multicenter randomized Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (1993-2001). Participants were women aged 50 to 74 years followed prospectively for up to 13 years for cancer screening. The influence of HRT on the primary outcome of NSCLC incidence and secondary outcomes of all-cause and disease-specific mortality were assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for covariates. RESULTS: In the overall cohort of 75,587 women, 1147 women developed NSCLC after a median follow-up of 11.5 years. HRT use was characterized as 49.4% current users, 17.0% former users, and 33.6% never users. Increased age, smoking, comorbidities, and family history were associated with increased risk of NSCLC. On multivariable analysis, current HRT use was associated with reduced risk of NSCLC compared with never users (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.93; P  =  .009). HRT or oral contraception use was not associated with significant differences in all-cause mortality or disease-specific mortality. CONCLUSIONS: These data represent among the largest prospective cohorts suggesting HRT use may have a protective effect on the development of NSCLC among women; the physiological basis of this effect merits further study; however, the results may influence discussion surrounding HRT use in women.





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