Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Estimating cancer treatment intensity from SEER cancer registry data: methods and implications for population-based registry studies of pediatric cancers.

Tobin JL, Thomas SM, Freyer DR, Hamilton AS, Milam JE. Estimating cancer treatment intensity from SEER cancer registry data: methods and implications for population-based registry studies of pediatric cancers. Cancer Causes & Control : Ccc. 2020 Oct 1; 31(10):881-890.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: The Intensity of Treatment Rating (ITR) Scale condenses treatment and clinical characteristics into a single measure to study treatment effects on downstream health outcomes across cancer types. This rating was originally developed for clinicians to determine from medical charts. However, large studies are often unable to access medical charts for all study participants. We developed and tested a method of estimating treatment intensity (TI) using cancer registry and patient self-reported data. METHODS: We estimated two versions of TI for a cohort of pediatric cancer survivors-one utilized information solely available from cancer registry variables (TI) and the other included registry and self-reported information (TI) from survey participants. In a subset of cases (n? = 135) for whom the gold standard TI (TI) was known, both TI and TI were compared to TI by calculating percent agreement and weighted Cohen's kappa, overall and within cancer subtypes. RESULTS: In comparison to TI, 71% of TI scores from both methods were in agreement (k? = 0.61 TI/0.54 TI). Among subgroups, agreement ranged from lowest (46% TI/39% TI) for non-defined tumors (e.g., "Tumor-other"), to highest (94% TI/94% TI) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CONCLUSIONS: We developed a methodology to estimate TI for pediatric cancer research when medical chart review is not possible. High reliability was observed for ALL, the most common pediatric cancer. Additional validation is needed among a larger sample of other cancer subgroups. The ability to estimate TI from cancer registry data would assist with monitoring effects of treatment during survivorship in registry-based epidemiological studies.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.