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Routine intensive care unit admission among patients undergoing major pancreatic surgery for cancer: No effect on failure to rescue.

Cerullo M, Gani F, Chen SY, Canner JK, Dillhoff M, Cloyd J, Pawlik TM. Routine intensive care unit admission among patients undergoing major pancreatic surgery for cancer: No effect on failure to rescue. Surgery. 2019 Apr 1; 165(4):741-746.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: An understanding of the overall routine intensive care unit utilization, and characterization of the factors associated with a routine intensive care unit stay, may help identify ways to decrease overutilization of this resource after pancreatic surgery. METHODS: Patients undergoing major pancreatic resection were identified in the Truven Health Analytics (Ann Arbor, MI) MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database from 2010 to 2014. Routine postoperative intensive care unit admission was defined as an admission to the intensive care unit of 24 hours or less on postoperative day zero. The association between routine intensive care unit admission and postoperative outcomes, including extended length of stay, failure to rescue, and total inpatient costs were evaluated. RESULTS: Of 3,280 patients who underwent a major pancreatic resection, 1,715 patients (52.3%) had a routine intensive care unit admission, which trended down over time (2010, n? = 349; 53.0% versus 2014, n? = 299; 47.5%; P? = .019). The incidence of failure to rescue among patients who were routinely admitted to the intensive care unit (3.7%) was comparable to those admitted to the floor (1.7%, P? = .098). Patients who were routinely admitted to the intensive care unit after major pancreatic resection had a median length of stay of 10 days (IQR: 7-15 days) versus 8 days (IQR: 7-12 days) for patients who were not admitted to the ICU (P < .001). Routine intensive care unit admission was not associated with higher overall payments (ratio of adjusted total payments: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.98-1.06, P? = .297). CONCLUSION: Routine intensive care unit admission was associated with a longer length of stay but did not translate into lower failure to rescue among patients.





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