skip to page content
Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Systems Research

Go to the VA ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Collaborative capacity and patient-centered care in the Veterans' Health Administration Community Living Centers

Sullivan JL, Weinburg DB, Gidmark S, Engle RL, Parker VA, Tyler DA. Collaborative capacity and patient-centered care in the Veterans' Health Administration Community Living Centers. International Journal of Care Coordination. 2019 Jun 1; 22(2):90-9.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

Introduction Previous research in acute care settings has shown that collaborative capacity, defined as the way providers collaborate as equal team members, can be improved by the ways in which an organization supports its staff and teams. This observational cross-sectional study examines the association between collaborative capacity and supportive organizational context, supervisory support, and person-centered care in nursing homes to determine if similar relationships exist. Methods We adapted the Care Coordination Survey for nursing homes and administered it to clinical staff in 20 VA Community Living Centers. We used random effects models to examine the associations between supportive organizational context, supervisory support, and person-centered care with collaborative capacity outcomes including quality of staff interactions, task independence, and collaborative influence. Results A total of 723 Community Living Center clinical staff participated in the Care Coordination Survey resulting in a response rate of 29%. We found that teamwork and collaboration-measured as task interdependence, quality of interactions and collaborative influence-did not differ significantly between Community Living Centers but did differ significantly across occupational groups. Moreover, staff members' experiences of teamwork and collaboration were positively associated with supportive organizational context and person-centered care. Discussion Our findings suggest that elements of organizational context are important to facilitating collaborative capacity. Additionally, investing in staffing, rewards, and person-centered care may improve teamwork.





Questions about the HSR website? Email the Web Team

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.