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Joint replacement surgery in homeless veterans.

Bennett CG, Lu LY, Thomas KA, Giori NJ. Joint replacement surgery in homeless veterans. Arthroplasty today. 2017 Dec 1; 3(4):253-256.

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Abstract:

Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) in a homeless patient is generally considered contraindicated. Here, we report our known medical and social (housing and employment) results of homeless veterans who had TJA. Thirty-seven TJAs were performed on 33 homeless patients (31 men) at our hospital between November 2000 and March 2014. This was 1.2% of all TJAs. Average age was 54 years. Average hospital stay was 4.1 days. There were no major inpatient complications. Thirty-four cases had at least 1-year follow-up in any clinic within the Veterans Affairs health care system. There were no known surgery-related reoperations or readmissions. At final follow-up, 24 patients had stable housing and 9 were employed. The extensive and coordinated medical and social services that were provided to veterans from the Department of Veterans Affairs contributed to our positive results.





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