Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Detection of antimicrobial resistance by small rural hospital microbiology laboratories: comparison of survey responses with current NCCLS laboratory standards.

Stevenson KB, Samore M, Barbera J, Moore JW, Hannah E, Houck P, Tenover FC, Gerberding JL. Detection of antimicrobial resistance by small rural hospital microbiology laboratories: comparison of survey responses with current NCCLS laboratory standards. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease. 2003 Sep 1; 47(1):303-11.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

Microbiology laboratory personnel from 77 rural hospitals in Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and eastern Washington were surveyed in July 2000 regarding their routine practices for detecting antimicrobial resistance. Their self-reported responses were compared to recommended laboratory practices. Most hospitals reported performing onsite bacterial identification and susceptibility testing. Many reported detecting targeted antimicrobial resistant organisms. While only 5/61 hospitals (8%) described using screening tests capable of detecting all 8 targeted types of resistance, most (57/61, 93%) were capable of accurately screening for at least 6 types. Conversely, most hospitals (58/61, 95%) reported confirmatory testing capable of identifying only 3 or fewer resistance types with high-level penicillin resistance among pneumococci, methicillin and vancomycin resistance among staphylococci and enterococci, and extended spectrum beta-lactamase production by Gram-negative bacilli presenting the greatest difficulties. Furthermore, only 50% of hospitals compiled annual antibiogram reports to help physicians choose initial therapy for suspected infectious illnesses. This survey suggests that the antimicrobial susceptibility testing in many rural hospitals may be unreliable.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.