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Outcome by Gender in the Veterans Health Administration Motivating Overweight/Obese Veterans Everywhere Weight Management Program.

Batch BC, Goldstein K, Yancy WS, Sanders LL, Danus S, Grambow SC, Bosworth HB. Outcome by Gender in the Veterans Health Administration Motivating Overweight/Obese Veterans Everywhere Weight Management Program. Journal of women's health (2002). 2018 Jan 1; 27(1):32-39.

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Few evaluations of the Veterans Health Administration Motivating Overweight/Obese Veterans Everywhere (MOVE!) weight management program have assessed 6-month weight change or factors associated with weight change by gender. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Analysis of administrative data from a national sample of veterans in the VA MOVE! PROGRAM: RESULTS: A total of 62,882 participants were included, 14.6% were women. Compared with men, women were younger (49.6 years [standard deviation, SD, 10.8] vs. 59.3 years [SD, 9.8], p < 0.0001), less likely to be married (34.1% vs. 56.0%, p < 0.0001), and had higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (26.0% vs. 22.4%, p < 0.0001) and depression (49.3% vs. 32.9%, p < 0.001). The mean number of MOVE! visits attended by women was lower than men (5.6 [SD, 5.3] vs. 6.0 [SD, 5.9], p < 0.0001). Women, compared with men, reported lower rates of being able to rely on family or friends (35.7% vs. 40.8%, p < 0.0001). Observed mean percent change in weight for women was -1.5% (SD, 5.2) and for men was -1.9% (SD, 4.8, p < 0.0001). The odds of 5% weight loss were no different for women (body-mass index [BMI] > 25 kg/m) compared with men (BMI > 25 kg/m; odds ratio, 1.05 [95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.11; p = 0.13]). CONCLUSIONS: Women veterans lost less weight overall compared with men. There was no difference in the odds of achieving clinically significant weight loss by gender. The majority of women and men enrolled lost < 5% weight despite being enrolled in a lifestyle intervention. Future studies should focus on identifying program- and participant-level barriers to weight loss.





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