Talk to the Veterans Crisis Line now
U.S. flag
An official website of the United States government

Health Services Research & Development

Go to the ORD website
Go to the QUERI website

HSR&D Citation Abstract

Search | Search by Center | Search by Source | Keywords in Title

Rationale and Design of the Lung Cancer Screening Implementation. Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care Study.

Miranda LS, Datta S, Melzer AC, Wiener RS, Davis JM, Tong BC, Golden SE, Slatore CG. Rationale and Design of the Lung Cancer Screening Implementation. Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care Study. Annals of the American Thoracic Society. 2017 Oct 1; 14(10):1581-1590.

Dimensions for VA is a web-based tool available to VA staff that enables detailed searches of published research and research projects.

If you have VA-Intranet access, click here for more information vaww.hsrd.research.va.gov/dimensions/

VA staff not currently on the VA network can access Dimensions by registering for an account using their VA email address.
   Search Dimensions for VA for this citation
* Don't have VA-internal network access or a VA email address? Try searching the free-to-the-public version of Dimensions



Abstract:

Screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography has been demonstrated to reduce lung cancer-related mortality and is being widely implemented. Further research in this area is needed to assess the impact of screening on patient-centered outcomes. Here, we describe the design and rationale for a new study entitled Lung Cancer Screening Implementation: Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care. The protocol is composed of an interconnected series of studies evaluating patients and clinicians who are engaged in lung cancer screening in real-world settings. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate communication processes that are being used in routine care and to identify best practices that can be readily scaled up for implementation in multiple settings. We hypothesize that higher overall quality of patient-clinician communication processes will be associated with lower levels of distress and decisional conflict as patients decide whether or not to participate in lung cancer screening. This work is a critical step toward identifying modifiable mechanisms that are associated with high quality of care for the millions of patients who will consider lung cancer screening. Given the enormous potential benefits and burdens of lung cancer screening on patients, clinicians, and the healthcare system, it is important to identify and then scale up quality communication practices that positively influence patient-centered care.





Questions about the HSR&D website? Email the Web Team.

Any health information on this website is strictly for informational purposes and is not intended as medical advice. It should not be used to diagnose or treat any condition.